The Online Scots Dictionary

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Scots is the Germanic language, related to English, spoken in Lowland Scotland and Ulster, not the Celtic language Gaelic!

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Page 26 of 44 for the letter H

hint, hent,
hint [hɪnt]
n. A moment, an instant, an indication of.
hint, hent, hin, hin', hind, hant, hinder, hinner, hiner, hinder, hinner, hinter, hinderend, hinnerend, hinneren, hindermaist, hinnermaist, hintermaist, hint-end, hintend, hinend, hin-end, hinnend, hint-haund, hind-haund, hint-haun', hint-haun, hint-han, hintside, hindside, hintmaist, hindmaist, hinmaist, hin'most, hinner-en, hinnerenn, himlest, himnest, hinmost, hidmost, hinmost, hinner-enn, hinnèr-enn, hinderly, hinnerly, hinterlie, hinderlie, hinnerlie, hinterlie, hinderley,
hint ['hɪnt, 'hɪn(d)]
n. The back, rear. Of time: the end, the period immediately following.
prep. Behind.
adv. Behind, in the rear.
adj. Belonging to, or at the back, rear.
comp. hinder ['hɪn(d)ər, 'hɪntər] adj. Of place: behind, in the rear, posterior, more remote. Of time: last, past, latter.
superl. hintmaist ['hɪn(t)mest], hindermaist adj. Hindmost, last in position, furthest behind, final

hinderly ['hɪn(d)ərlɪ, 'hɪntərlɪ]
adv. Eventually, at the last. Loaded with the weight on the read axle.

Compounds and phrases etc.

hinder end: the later or final part, the back or rear
at the hinder end: ultimately
hint-end: the extremity or rear part, the latter part of a period of time, the hindquarters
hint-haund: the last, hindmost, dilatory, careless, late
hintit: I.Sh. not right in the head
hintside: the reverse
hintside foremaist: backwards, back to front
hip, hippit, hippet, hippitie, hippity, hip-grippit, hippin, hippen, hippeen, hippin-towie, hippen-towie,
hip [hɪp]
n. A hip. A curving projection on the lower slopes of a hill side.

hippit, hippitie
adj. Useless, lamed with thigh strain, having stiff hip-joints.

hipple
n. A limping, hopping movement. A person with a limp. An ailment which causes such a (painful) gait.
v. To go lame, walk with a limp, to hobble . To tie the back legs of an animal

hippin ['hɪpən]
n. A baby's nappy

Compounds and phrases etc.

dug-hip: a rosehip
hip-grippit: having stiff hip-joints.
hippin-towie: a rope for hanging nappies on
hiplin: I.Sh. an adult cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo
hippans, hippan, hippen, hippens,
hippans ['hɪpəns]
n. pl. Hips, the fruit of the wild rose.
hird, herd, hyrd, hurd, herdie, hirdie,
hird [hɪrd, hɛrd, U. hʌrd]
n. One who tends or watches over sheep or cattle, a shepherd. A spiritual shepherd, a pastor.
dim. hirdie
v. To tend, take care of, to watch over sheep or cattle. To keep separate, drive away, alienate. To watch over, look after, attend to, a person or object. I.Sh. To bring home crops after harvesting.
pt. pp. hirdit
hirdie-girdie, hirdy-girdy,
hirdie-girdie ['hɪrdɪ 'gɪrdɪ]
n. Uproar, confusion, disorder.
adv. In disorder or confusion, topsy-turvy.
hire, hyre, hired, hir't,
hire [haɪr]
n. Seaman's pay. A titbit given as an inducement or reward.
v. To hire, to take on, engage someone as a servant, to engage oneself as employee. To let out on hire. To season food.
pt. pp. hired adj. Hired, seasoned.

Compounds and phrases etc.

hirehoose: farm labour or service, the place where the servant is engaged to go
hirn, hirne, hirnie, hirni, hirnock, hirnik, hirnick, hirnek,
hirn [I.Sh. hɪrn]
n. A corner, nook, hiding place.
dim. hirnie, hirnock
hirple, harple, herple, hurple, hipple, hirpelt, hirpled, hirplock, hirploch, hirplin, hirplin',
hirple ['hɪrp(ə)l]
n. A limp.
dim. hirplock ['hɪrplək]
v. To limp, hobble, to cripple or hamper some project.
pt. pp. hirpelt

hirplin ['hɪrplɪn]
v. Limping.
hirsle, hirsel, hersel, hersle, hirstle, hissle, hursle, hirsel, hershel, hershell, hirsele, hirdsell,
hirsel [hɪrsl, hɛrsl]
n. A flock of sheep, the number of sheep looked after by one shepherd or on one small farm. A drove of cattle. An allotted area of pasturage to be grazed by a flock. A flock of anything, a large number or quantity, a multitude, a crowd.
v. To sort sheep into hirsels.

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